Cyclone Inspired Poetry 3

If Glass Could Talk

for Jacque

If only all the tiny shards of glass
bottle brown
wine green
yellow and purple orchid swirls
could talk.

What would they say
if fragments realigned
knit themselves back together
like broken bones entwined in casts
and heroes walked?

What if the paralyzed
could miracle embrace
pain and grief
trauma and loss
till they walked with stars?

I breathe out Vincent’s starry night
from living room wall
to outside door
then coffee table book on my floor
I wonder – would he obsess about lost socks
from cyclone’s past?

 

(c) June Perkins, Words and Image

Advertisements

The Conversation

theconversationsmall

Written in Response to Australian Children’s Poetry Prompt 6#

Perhaps this a young adults poem though rather than for children. What do you feel are the themes of this poem and what age group would you share it with? As for the structure, the key to that is the word window. . .

I will keep thinking about the prompt and see if I can create a poem for younger children.

No Geometry

JunePerkins_BrisbaneGlory_BE173-940x623
(c)Image June Perkins

The rain itself hath no geometry, no limits, no form, but it taketh on one form or another, according to the restrictions of its vessel. In the same way, the Holy Essence of the Lord God is boundless, immeasurable, but His graces and splendours become finite in the creatures…

-`Abdu’l-Baha, Selections From the Writings of `Abdu’l-Baha

For more see Nineteen Months

A Sense of Wonder

DSC_8609
City Beauty – June Perkins

For Rachel Carson

Rachel says
open your children to wonder
about birds
together learn each ones song
and their many names
as you  wander  their land
maybe imagine flying
to their tree top
homes.

Rachel says
imprint in them
the story of the sea
the delicacy of balance even on the rugged shorelines
through them knowing
its biography
as if it’s their best friend.

Rachel says
listen to the wind
find the names of each wind
so you can read its personality
warm or cold
and know when you should
stay away from the sea
and when you can embrace and nurture
it.

Rachel says
open to them to wonder
so they will not pass by this world
without knowing it calls
to us
from stars to shoreline
moon dust to leaves.

Rachel leaves her love of nature
on the shorelines of our present
each wisdom wave
saying
wonder
wonder
wonder

The late Nell Arnold introduced me  to Rachel Carson’s writing after seeing some of my photographs and poetry.  We had been living in Far North Queensland in a country town surrounded by the natural environment.

I always loved biology and nature at school and one of our best excursions was mapping the shoreline, and if I had heard about Rachel earlier I am sure I would have wanted to study ecology.  I think it’s time for me to read more of her work.

I am working on my first nature essay and searching for a focus for it.  The clues come to me in photography, poetry, parenting, and connection. I am contemplating how science and art can come together and how we can find nature in the city.

Living in the city now, I miss that connection.  I search for splinters of it, in noticing the bush turkeys that dig our yard and taking opportunities to go to the park and look for wildlife and work out the species of the trees. Every time we leave the city I feel the pull of the shorelines.  I feel sad that we had to leave the natural surrounds of our old home for the opportunities the city offers. I carry those shorelines and rainforests in my soul.

If only the opportunities could exist in the spaces close to the environment, so that wonder was inbuilt into our opportunities. Now I look for the times we can go and find ourselves closer to the earth…

(c) June Perkins