Ten Things About Poetry and Me: Teena Raffa-Mulligan

1.What is your earliest memory of poetry?

Sitting beside my tiny English grandmother on the sofa or my bed, listening to her recite poems to me. I particularly recall a sad poem called Papa’s Letter about a little boy who writes a letter to his father in Heaven and is trampled by a horse when he goes out to post it. I’ve since learnt it was written in the nineteenth century by an anonymous poet. Another that lingers in my memory from that time is William Allingham’s The Fairies, a favourite of both Nana’s and Mum’s and one I eventually shared with my own children.

 

2.When and why did you begin to write poetry for children?

I always thought of myself as a writer, not a poet, though I did produce a number of rather serious contemplative poems as a young adult. It never occurred to me to write poems specifically for children until years later when my children were in primary school. I was writing mainly short stories, picture books and chapter books but occasionally I’d have an idea for a poem. I discovered The School Magazine in 1998 and began to write poetry with these wonderful publications in mind. Some of my published poems were initially written as rhyming picture books that didn’t sell in that format. I believe in being open to possibilities so I looked at alternative markets for them and struck lucky.

 

3. Do you think writing for children is the same or different from writing for adults?

The same skills as a writer are required for both. It’s a matter of keeping your audience in mind when choosing what to write and how to write it. However, a well-written poem for children will be appreciated equally by adults. We’ve all been children and can remember how we felt in our younger lives. When poets can draw on this child aspect of themselves, the poetry they produce will have universal appeal.

I know how much I enjoy reading the wonderful poems being submitted to the Australian Children’s Poetry website for posting as Poem of the Day and how often I think, ‘Wish I’d written that!’

  

4. If you could be any poet in history who would you choose to be and why?

John Masefield. His poem ‘Sea Fever’ has been a favourite of mine since childhood for its rhythm and imagery. It gives me goosebumps even now when I say it aloud. Cargoes, too, has a wonderful sense of rhythm.

 

  

5. Give five words to describe your poetry?

Child-friendly, whimsical, playful, amusing, simple

   

6.Share a few lines from one of the poems you have written that you are most proud of?

‘ Leaf Lace’ was inspired by the discovery that caterpillars had been making a feast of my geraniums. One night when I couldn’t sleep, I mentally sifted and sorted the words until they felt right.

 

Lace maker

Toils secretly

Tucked out of sight;

Creates ornate

Patterns

Until they’re just right.

Delicate, intricate

Handiwork done

Designer departs

To start

The next one.

Serrates, decorates

All my plants in this way.

I confess

I’m impressed

At this leaf lace display.

 

 7.What is your favourite form of poetry?

Rhyme. I get a lot of pleasure from playing with different rhyming patterns, so I might focus on rhymes within lines, or an AAB, CCB end line rhyme pattern. Whatever pattern I choose, it’s always a challenge to make the rhyme feel natural rather than contrived. I also enjoy reading well-written rhyming poems.

 

8, Have any of your poems been illustrated? If so what did you think of the illustration? 

All of the poems I’ve had accepted by The School Magazine (about 20 in all, several also reprinted) have been accompanied by wonderful illustrations. It’s always a thrill to receive my copies of the magazine in the mail and see how an artist has interpreted my words.

 

9. Where is your best spot for writing poetry and why?

I don’t have a best spot. Once I have an idea, I will mull it around in my head as I go about my daily activities, jotting down fragments or lines in a notebook as they come to me. Often I’ll mentally work on a poem if I’m awake during the night. When I’m a passenger in the car also seems to trigger my poetic impulses. Of course, the real work of refining poetry happens in my office when I start keying my random bits and pieces into the computer.  

 

10. What advice do you have for other poets wanting to write for children?

Read the work of contemporary poets to get a sense of what is being written and published now. Today’s children are incredibly savvy and they’re exposed to very different influences than earlier generations through technology and social media. Keep in mind who it is you are writing for, and don’t forget there is still a child in you who knows what it is to be a child. Write from that place.

You can find out more about Tina here

Website: www.teenaraffamulligan.com

FB author page: https://www.facebook.com/TeenaRaffaMulligan/

Twitter: @TraffaM

Blog: https://intheirownwrite.wordpress.com

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Day Dreaming

Not sure is it a poem or blog, or simply a thought for the day. Maybe it is just all of them.

Pearlz Dreaming

Day Dreamer 1 – Collage photographs -By June Perkins

This week the internet just made my creative head space feel

so cluttered and

fuzzy, out of shape and

tired.

I decided I need a break from the grief

the news

the despair

the information

even its joy can seem too much and

become over the top.

I just needed a break to

dream and bask in the sunlight

pick daisies for the guinea pigs

and think about stories

to write.

But before I disappeared,

I spoke some friends

on line

because I was at home writing

and they said they felt the same way too

and we shared a story or two.

They had been to

to walk their dogs

and bask in the sunlight.

They too felt the power of the story

the book

and the day dream.

When I went off line I thought

about friendship across time…

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Sculpted fantasy yard creatures

Wow! These inspire me to write poetry too!

henryherz.com

Fantasy sculptures that inspire me to write more picture books, from Scott Radke and the mad geniuses at Bored Panda.

“My name is Scott Radke and I’m an artist from Cleveland Ohio. I create dream-like characters from out of my imagination and photograph them in natural environments. I keep the meanings behind my work simple and just create and let my work speak for itself. It’s very meditative for me to create and I’m fortunate to have this as my purpose and livelihood.”

Scott Radke

Scott Radke

Scott Radke

Scott Radke

Scott Radke

Scott Radke

Scott Radke

Scott Radke

Scott Radke

Scott Radke

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Ten Things About Poetry and Me: Virginia Lowe

In 2016 Virginia was awarded the Leila St John Award for services to children’s literature in Victoria. Here she is with the medal.

1. What is your earliest memory of poetry?

My mother was a pianist. She was always at the piano, and I could sing 80 nursery rhymes when I was two (so my baby book says). Then there were the Zoe McHenry songs as well. All of these are rhymes, of course, so my first introduction to poetry was via song. The piano was a player piano, and we had rolls of most of the Gilbert and Sullivan operas as well. As soon as I could read, I could sing these too – and loved them.

I think we also had to  AA Milne When We were Very Young and Now We are Six, as I vaguely remember ‘Jonathan Jo had a mouth like an O’, ‘Christopher Robin is saying his prayers’ (oh no, it’s called ‘Vespers’ isn’t it?) and ‘Buckingham Palace’ – but I read them so often to my own children later, that it’s hard to think back through that to my own childhood experiences.

We learned quite a lot at school, for which I am very grateful – they stay with you for ever. I remember some of Walter de la Mare’s, Wordsworth’s ‘Daffodils’, and Shelley’s ‘The Cloud’ from elocution  in secondary school).

 

 

2. When and why did you begin to write poetry for children?

I have written poetry for as long as I can remember (at least since adolescence) and I am interested in children’s literature.  I have been a children’s and school librarian and lectured on children’s literature at uni, the book from my thesis is Stories, Pictures and Reality: Two Children Tell, and for the last twenty years I have run a manuscript assessment agency Create a Kids’ Book. Some of my poetry naturally turns out to be for children.

Published by Routledge in 2006.

 

3. Do you think writing for children is the same or different as writing for adults (explain)

Pretty much the same – it’s all about playing with words, and settling on just the right words in just the right order, whether it’s for adults or children. I do think children like rhyming poetry better. At least the poems I remember from school – the ones of Walter de la Mare for instance, all rhyme. And the favourites of my own children – by Ogden Nash, Lewis Carroll and Doug McLeod for instance – also rhyme.

 

4. If you could be any poet in history who would you choose to be and why?

Emily Dickinson. I wouldn’t really want her isolated life, but in her few pithy words she can sum up a situation and an idea – it leaves me breathless sometimes! Such a philosopher.

 


5. Give five words to describe your poetry?

Narrative, socially aware. Take a simple idea and elevate it by cleverly twisting it and putting it in a poem. (Just needed some extra words for this one!)
6. Share a few lines from one of the poems you have written that you are most proud of?

From ‘Baby Walking’

a baby, much too small

stands stolidly erect

then deliberately

loses balance

to step forwards

into his future

as a biped

 

7. What is your favourite form of poetry?

The really short pithy ones telling a philosophical or social truth – but I can rarely manage it myself.

 

8. Tell me about how you like to perform your poems?

Other people’s poems: I used to take a poetry basket into schools, with about 30 little objects in, and everyone in the class would have a chance to feel in and take something out and hold it while I recited/read ‘its’ poem.

I just read mine, when I have a chance.

 

9. Where is your best spot for writing poetry and why?

In my study, at my computer. I rarely know what I think till I see what I say (as EM Foster had it…)

Sometimes I also think of a few lines, or solutions to lyrical problems, while I am swimming laps in the pool – there is pen and paper in the car for me to write them down as soon as I get out.

 

10. What advice do you have for other poets wanting to write for children?

Keep writing poems. Some of them will turn out to be suitable for children, some not. And read, read, read. Get a name for yourself by publishing to the weekly prompts on Australian Children’s Poetry https://australianchildrenspoetry.com.au/

 

To find out more about Virginia

https://silverbirchpress.wordpress.com/?s=virginia+lowe.

https://australianchildrenspoetry.com.au/?s=virginia+lowe.

www.createakidsbook.com

 

(Interview by June Perkins, This blog is part of a series on Poets for Children, Ten Things About Poetry and Me.)

 

News update

Australian Children's Poetry

Bush Poetry Slam

Poets can enter this fun, free event and win prizes as part of Sydney’s inaugural Bushranger Festival. The poetry slam competition will be held on Saturday May 20 at 4pm at St Ives Wildflower Garden, 420 Mona Vale Road, St Ives. For more details email contact@blaxlandanddaughter.com

CJ Dennis Poetry Competition

The 2017 Toolangi CJ Dennis Poetry Competition is now open for entries. Unlike most poetry competitions, it has a category for ‘adults writing for children’. This is judged by an adult, but there is also a separate award judged by local primary school children. Closing date September 1. Prizes will be awarded at the CJ Dennis Poetry Festival on Saturday, October 21. For full details and entry form go to http://www.thecjdennissociety.com/index.php

Poetry pointers

Where do you get ideas? How do you write a poem? Do poems have to rhyme? What makes it a poem if it doesn’t…

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Poem of the Day

This was my response to the Sunshine prompt over at the Australian Children’s Poetry Blog.

Australian Children's Poetry

Sunshine

Swaddle me in sunshine

sang the fairy child.

Weave me into forest,

tell me you have smiled.

Dance me tales of blossoms.

Look carefully for my signs.

Swaddle me in sunshine,

Now climb the magic vines.

Breathe me into spring time.

Search for the unseen.

Swaddle me in sunshine.

Cover trees in green

Swaddle me in sunshine,

when winter’s on her way.

Find for me some shelter

to keep the cold at bay.

June Perkins
  • Submitted in response to Poetry Prompt #15

June said: Today the muse visited – with that sunshine topic. Perhaps it was the approach of winter and a memory of my mum trying to convince me that fairies exist.

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Magic Fish Dreaming – The Book Trailer

My first book trailer over at my Magic Fish Dreaming Site.

Magic Fish Dreaming

Today we finally have a book trailer for Magic Fish Dreaming!

I have been wanting to do this for a while.

There is so much for Indi (Independent) publishers to do, and we try to do as much of it as we can ourselves.

So we find ourselves doing publicity, sales, distribution, accounting,  book trailers, our blogs, websites and more!

The Magic Fish Dreaming team is so pleased to have our book in 12 shops in two states, and to have three suppliers on board (they do libraries and schools).

This trailer is especially to assist all our sales outlets and suppliers boost the public’s knowledge of the book. We hope it helps!

Half the challenge with books is having people walk into the shop and ask for it, or spot it on the shelves.

If you love our book we would love you to share this trailer so it…

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